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  • Garbology Admin 12:00 pm on May 5, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , wastefulness   

    Garbology – Please Recycle 

    By:

    I am a college student living with my boyfriend and three other roommates. For the most part, we try our best to recycle, whether it being glass/plastic bottles or cardboard boxes. Most of the bottles, either plastic or glass, can be turned in for cash value of five cents.  There are several locations located in Oregon where you can turn in these bottles.

    Over the past couple months, I have been collecting any bottle that can be turned in for cash value and sticking them into white garbage bags. I have collected a total of three full bags and I am on my fourth bag! In addition to collecting these bottles, I am also collecting the metal bottle caps from glass bottles, usually beer or hard cider. I found a great website about how you can recycle your metal bottle caps. It explains that instead of throwing them into your recycling bin, that is also filled with cardboard, metal cans and plastic products, you should put the bottle caps into a metal can then crimp it so they don’t fall out. Why? Well, because the bottle caps are so small that they usually get lost with the other materials when they get sorted by their sizes.

    I have asked my roommates if they could put any bottle that has that cash value in a bag so it makes a little more easier for me to collect the bottles, but really no one does that. Therefore, I have been garbage diving at least once a week before the trash man comes and takes all out garbage.

    The House Bill of 3145 states that water/flavored water, beer/malt beverages, soda water/mineral water, and carbonated soft drinks will be accepted in containers that are 3 liters or less in size. New beverages will be accepted if the bottle or cans are from 4 ounces to 1.5 liters in size. In addition to this, metal cans that require a can opener will not be accepted, along with wine, liquor, dairy or milk substitutes containers. All redeemable containers are labeled with the OR 5¢ refund value on the label.

    Oregon’s Bottle Bill was introduced in 1971 and was created to help address the growing litter problem along Oregon’s beaches, highways and other public areas. It was the very first bottle bill in the United States and was so successful that there are now ten other states that have similar programs.

    -UPDATE-

    March 7th 2015

    My boyfriend and I drive to the nearest BottleDrop A girl putting a glass bottle into the bottledrop centercenter and I turned six  full bags of cans/bottles.

    I would say the overall experience wasn’t terrible, but the machines they use to count/collect the bottles can be a little weird. Its possible it was just the machine I was using that was acting up, but every time I would put in a glass bottle, the little conveyor belts to take the bottle down, wouldn’t grab the bottle, almost like it was too heavy. Therefore, I would have to slightly push the bottle in to give the conveyor belt a little help. Sometimes I would push the bottle a little too much and the machine would tell me to not throw in the bottles.

    The other issue that happened was that the machine would would just stop, spit out a receipt of all the bottles I had collected, and would require a person to “fix” the machine. All the worker would have to do is open the machine, it would print out a receipt for them,  it looks fine, close it and it would start working again. This happened probably about four times.

    a girl holding up 11 dollarsI had turned in a total of 229 cans and bottles! The total amount I received was $11.45, which isn’t too bad for just collecting bottles over the course of 3 months.

    It felt really good to get money back just by collecting bottles and cans that you use everyday.

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  • Lorelle VanFossen 5:28 am on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , alice bradshaw, , artist, artwork, , environmental art, exhibits, galleries, , glossary, jargon, rubbish, rubbish artist, terminology, , , wastefulness   

    Alice Bradshaw: Rubbish Artist and Educator 

    Alice Bradshaw - Doodle - The Good Life - Apartment - April 2005 - photo courtesy of Paul Harfleet.

    Alice Bradshaw – Doodle – The Good Life – Apartment – April 2005 – photo courtesy of Paul Harfleet

    Alice Bradshaw, a prize-winning artist and academic specializing in rubbish and trash. Her work has been featured in museums, galleries, and festivals throughout the UK and Australia.

    Alice Bradshaw describes herself this way:

    I work with a wide range of media and processes involving the manipulation of everyday objects and materials. Mass-produced, anonymous objects are often rendered dysfunctional caricatures of themselves, addressing concepts of purpose and futility. I create or accentuate subtleties, blurring distinctions between the absurd and the mundane, with the notion that the environment the work exists in becomes integral to the work itself.

    Rubbish: A Research Project is study project by Rubbish by Bradshaw that is a long time study project. She shares her studies on the various forms of rubbish including crap, debris, detritus, dirt, discards, junk, leftovers, litter, refuse, rejects, shit, ruins, and others. Each one features a definition and quotes, citations, and references that may be of value to you and your classes.

    On the topic of garbage she shares:

    “I use the word ‘garbage’ […] because I think it’s really recognizable to people. I think that’s what most people call their waste or their discards. That’s why I use it; it’s not a statement of my political or ideological stance on the issue of discards. A lot of people feel very strongly about choosing the right word, and I really respect where that comes from. I think that what we call the things we throw away is very important and it does relate to the way that what we throw out is constructed as dirty and not okay to touch or to consider as having value or being a resource.”
    Heather Rogers – Gone Tomorrow: The Hidden Life of Garbage (2005) The New Press.

    “A Dump: The whole world, everything which surrounds me here, is to me a boundless dump with no ends or borders, an inexhaustible, diverse sea of garbage. This whole dump is full of twinkling stars, reflections and fragments of cultures.” […] A dump not only devours everything, preserving forever, but one might say it continually generates something: this is where some kind of shoots come from for new project, ideas, a certain enthusiasm arises, hopes for rebirth of something, though it is well-known that all of this will be covered with new layers of garbage.”
    Ilya Kabakov – Documents of Contemporary Art: The Archive (2006) p.32/37

    “Young people everywhere have been allowed to choose between love and a garbage disposal unit. Everywhere they have chosen the garbage disposal unit.”
    Guy Debord – Formula for a New City, The Incomplete Works of the Situationist International, ed. Christopher Gray (1974)

    “A newspaper that you’re not reading can be used for anything; and the same people didn’t think it was immoral to wrap their garbage in newspaper.”
    Robert Rauschenberg in interview with by Dorothy Seckler, Archives of American Art (1965)

    Her other projects include:

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 6:41 am on October 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: abstracts, , , , , , excess, , forms of excess, , , , , literature, , , wastefulness, workshop   

    Call for Abstracts on Forms of Excess in Post-1960 Art, Film, and Literature 

    Discard Studies announced a call for abstracts on the topic of “Forms of Excess in Post-1960 Art, Film, and Literature” for the University of York in the UK with a February 2015 deadline, followed up with a special event workshop and exhibits.

    This appears to be an open request, and it comes with some interesting topic ideas, many of which may apply to our Garbology campus and classroom projects.

    Visual art, film, and literature since 1960 has been marked by leftovers, repetitions, and time lags, despite emerging in a climate of accelerated technological development and the erasure of leisure time. From artworks that incorporate the trash and detritus of consumerist excess to novels and films that indulge in narrative ‘time-wasting,’ the cultural production of the last fifty years has revelled in the wasteful and excessive. This event asks: what are the aesthetics of excess? What are its material, temporal and figurative manifestations? Is artistic time-wasting a radical form of resistance to the capitalist imperative to be productive? Or do art’s glorious expenditures reinforce aesthetic hierarchies that privilege ‘difficulty’? We invite 20-minute papers from postgraduates and early-career researchers that engage with waste and excess in post-1960 art, literature, and film. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) the following:

    • Narrative: digressions; footnotes and marginalia; listing; repetition; the non-event; the filler; reality effects
    • Queer theory: the concept of the queer subject as embodying non-(re)productivity; queer temporalities; drag and camp as recycling
    • The body: labour; time-wasting and protest
    • Feminism: the gendered dynamics of lack and excess
    • Economic surplus: abstraction; financial markets; concepts of utility and value
    • Digital waste: big data; information overload; archive fever
    • Cold War politics: nuclear waste; abundance and wasting as critical tactics
 
  • Lorelle VanFossen 5:51 am on October 24, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , antropology, archaelogy, , , , , higher education, , research, , sciences, waste studies, wastefulness   

    Discard Studies 

    Jeff Wall, The Destroyed Room, 1978. Glenstone. Bedroom with all the furnishings destroyed.

    Discard Studies is an educational site that explores the “throw-away culture.” Called “Critical Discard Studies,” it is an emerging interdisciplinary sub-field associated with Garbology and related natural and historical sciences. It studies and questions the premises of what seems normal or given within the greater role of society and culture, focusing not only on what we throw away but our wasteful life practices and culture.

    The site is designed as an online social platform for scholars, activists, environmentalists, students, and others involved in the study of waste and wasting to gather and showcase and discuss this new field of study.

    The team behind the site recently released the Discard Studies Compendium, a glossary of critical key terms associated with studying waste and wasting, and as part of their effort to continue to develop this science discipline. It is a tremendous resource of garbage related terminology.

    Article highlights that feature links to research papers and calls for papers as well as topics for information and discussion include:

     
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