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  • Garbology Admin 12:00 pm on May 5, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , recycling, , , ,   

    Garbology – Please Recycle 

    By:

    I am a college student living with my boyfriend and three other roommates. For the most part, we try our best to recycle, whether it being glass/plastic bottles or cardboard boxes. Most of the bottles, either plastic or glass, can be turned in for cash value of five cents.  There are several locations located in Oregon where you can turn in these bottles.

    Over the past couple months, I have been collecting any bottle that can be turned in for cash value and sticking them into white garbage bags. I have collected a total of three full bags and I am on my fourth bag! In addition to collecting these bottles, I am also collecting the metal bottle caps from glass bottles, usually beer or hard cider. I found a great website about how you can recycle your metal bottle caps. It explains that instead of throwing them into your recycling bin, that is also filled with cardboard, metal cans and plastic products, you should put the bottle caps into a metal can then crimp it so they don’t fall out. Why? Well, because the bottle caps are so small that they usually get lost with the other materials when they get sorted by their sizes.

    I have asked my roommates if they could put any bottle that has that cash value in a bag so it makes a little more easier for me to collect the bottles, but really no one does that. Therefore, I have been garbage diving at least once a week before the trash man comes and takes all out garbage.

    The House Bill of 3145 states that water/flavored water, beer/malt beverages, soda water/mineral water, and carbonated soft drinks will be accepted in containers that are 3 liters or less in size. New beverages will be accepted if the bottle or cans are from 4 ounces to 1.5 liters in size. In addition to this, metal cans that require a can opener will not be accepted, along with wine, liquor, dairy or milk substitutes containers. All redeemable containers are labeled with the OR 5¢ refund value on the label.

    Oregon’s Bottle Bill was introduced in 1971 and was created to help address the growing litter problem along Oregon’s beaches, highways and other public areas. It was the very first bottle bill in the United States and was so successful that there are now ten other states that have similar programs.

    -UPDATE-

    March 7th 2015

    My boyfriend and I drive to the nearest BottleDrop A girl putting a glass bottle into the bottledrop centercenter and I turned six  full bags of cans/bottles.

    I would say the overall experience wasn’t terrible, but the machines they use to count/collect the bottles can be a little weird. Its possible it was just the machine I was using that was acting up, but every time I would put in a glass bottle, the little conveyor belts to take the bottle down, wouldn’t grab the bottle, almost like it was too heavy. Therefore, I would have to slightly push the bottle in to give the conveyor belt a little help. Sometimes I would push the bottle a little too much and the machine would tell me to not throw in the bottles.

    The other issue that happened was that the machine would would just stop, spit out a receipt of all the bottles I had collected, and would require a person to “fix” the machine. All the worker would have to do is open the machine, it would print out a receipt for them,  it looks fine, close it and it would start working again. This happened probably about four times.

    a girl holding up 11 dollarsI had turned in a total of 229 cans and bottles! The total amount I received was $11.45, which isn’t too bad for just collecting bottles over the course of 3 months.

    It felt really good to get money back just by collecting bottles and cans that you use everyday.

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  • Garbology Admin 12:00 pm on April 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , recycling, ,   

    Recycling: Past, Present & Future 

    Why recycle? Recycle is a process where you can reuse the material again. It’s like adding additional life to some materials. Some material can be recycled and some material can’t be. Without a recycle icon stamped is not recyclable, so therefore, it is trash.

    Past

    In the past, people bought, used, and threw items away. The amount of materials in landfills that got bigger and bigger. The cycle of buying, using, and throwing trash never stops. The amount in the landfill is so huge and it caught people’s attention and created concern for environment and its impact on other animals, air, and water.

    Present

    People are recycling aluminum cans, steel cans, newspapers, papers, cardboards, plastics, and magazines. People go online to find the latest news. Many companies urge people to sign up for paperless bills and online magazine subscriptions, but some people in the older generation buy newspaper to read, send bills via mail, and receive magazine via shipping. Kids use old cards and other recycled materials to create a recycled greeting card such as Valentine’s Day, Christmas card, and etc.

    Future

    Recycling will carry over into the future. People will have newer idea on how to improve recycling. After the older generation is gone, more people will be using online magazines, paperless bills, and paper money will be gone too. People will be carrying their own containers for water, coffee, or soda. Many art sculptures are made from recycled materials.

    Final Thought

    It is hard to believe how huge the landfill is. I think plastic is probably the biggest enemy trash in the sea, air, and the land. I think people should try to reuse a plastic container and refill with what have gone inside. This is better than throwing it away. It will eliminate recycling plastic. Keeping the landfills less is a toughest job.   Earth is your home, so keep it clean and beautiful.

     
    • ajweberman 2:56 am on April 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      garbology is the study of famous people’s trash. I invented the darn word so I should know.

  • Lorelle VanFossen 5:12 am on February 9, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: advertising, corporate greed, experiments, laws, marketing, recycling, technology, tracking trash, transmitters   

    Tracking Trash for Greed 

    In “One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s Big Data” by WIRED contributor Theo Priestley, an MIT lab created an experiment known ad “Trash Track” to track over 3,000 pieces of rubbish with transmitters.

    TrashTrack uses hundreds of small, smart, location aware tags: a first step towards the deployment of smart-dust – networks of tiny locatable and addressable microeletromechanical systems.These tags are attached to different types of trash so that these items can be followed through the city’s waste management system, revealing the final journey of our everyday objects in a series of real time visualizations.

    The project was started in 2012, and the experiments have spread to encouraging individuals to track their own garbage and the “removal-chain” of the garbage life cycle.

    It wasn’t long before big business found profit in tracking garbage.

    In 2013, the article explains:

    It came to light that a dozen of London’s recycling bins fitted with digital screens were tracking each smartphone and device that connected to them with WiFi. It allowed advertisers to deduce whether the same phone — although not necessarily the same person — is passing by. By recording the MAC address, it was then possible to track when a phone reconnects. The bins could track speed and location, potentially allowing personalized advertising that even adapts according to user behavior.

    The City of London has since taken this matter up legally because the Data Protection Act forbids this kind of snooping.

     
    • ajweberman 8:00 am on February 13, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      very very smart. I thought of the same thing. Should be available commercially.

  • Lorelle VanFossen 2:20 pm on December 26, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , foam blocks, recycling,   

    E-Waste and Foam Block Recycling Event January 3 

    In case you missed the email sent to faculty and staff at Clark College from Rebecca Benson, January 3, 2015 from 9am to 1pm is an E-Waste and Block Foam Recycling Event at Fisher’s Landing Transit Center in Vancouver, Washington.

    Did you get new electronics over the holidays?

    If so, there is a recycling event on January 3rd for block foam and electronic waste.

    Rebecca Benson is the Clark College Environmental Health and Safety Supervisor, and she describes the recycling material as:

    Electronic Waste

    Accepts – Camcorders; cassette players and tapes; CDs; CD player; cellular phones; computers; computer books; manuals and software; computer parts; accessories and components; CRT monitors; digital cameras; DVD/VHS movies; DVD/VCR players; electronics testing equipment; fax machines; flat panel monitors and televisions (LCD/plasma); floppy disks; keyboards (computer); laptops; modems; musical instruments; PDA (Personal Digital Assistant); printers; projectors (Home Theater, LCD, overhead, slide and video); radios; rechargeable batteries; scanners; stereo equipment; telephones; video game consoles; video games and accessories.

    Does Not Accept – Household batteries, microwave ovens, smoke detectors, rear projection, DLP, or console TVs.

    Block Foam

    Accepts – Only clean white #6 block foam

    Does Not Accept – plastic-wrapped yellow urethane foam, spongy polypropylene foam, food trays, foam film, hot tub covers, packing peanuts, and foam with cardboard, tape or metal attached.

    Check your email for details or contact Rebecca Benson in Gaiser Hall.

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 8:17 am on October 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: classes, , , garbology history, garbology in the news, , garbology projects, garbology research, , garbology study programs, recycling   

    October 22, 2014: Garbology News 

    Our featured news story comes from our neck of the planet, Marysville, Washington, where a woman is fighting city hall, literally.

    KingTV news story on Marysville woman protesting garbage bill and can.

    King-TV in Seattle reports on a woman in Marysville willing to go to jail rather than use her garbage can.

    She canceled her garbage pickup 20 years ago. Now that her Snohomish County home was annexed to the city of Marysville, she is required to use the provided 36 gallon garbage can and she refuses to use it, tried to return it, and refuses to pay the garbage bill for a can and garbage she says she does not need nor want. Because she has failed to pay her utility bill that includes sewer, water, and garbage, the city is threatening to turn off her services, and could have her arrested.

    Historical City and Garbage Image Collection: As highlighted in “Historical Images from Seattle Municipal Archives” on this site recently, the Seattle Municipal Archives on Flickr features images over the years of garbage trucks and sanitation workers. The images are public domain, though a citation is appreciated.

    The Intersection of Science and Policy: In the Corvallis Gazette Times, editor Mike McInally asks if academia is thinking too much, citing the Garbology Common Read project at WSU, that explores the issue of impartial research as “we grapple with increasingly complex issues that require scientific input,” and its impact on public policy as well as academia.

    Finally, peer inside yourself for evidence of what experts call “confirmation bias”: The tendency we all have (yes, even editorial writers) to give more weight to evidence that confirms our beliefs than to evidence that challenges them.

    Kathryn Schulz’s excellent book “Being Wrong” offers a broader discussion of this and the many other ways in which we can deceive ourselves. Writes Schulz: “We don’t assess evidence neutrally; we assess it in light of whatever theories we’ve already formed on the basis of whatever other, earlier evidence we have encountered.”

    We live in a world which increasingly requires a measure of scientific literacy. The good news is that it’s not outside our reach – but it requires a dose of intelligent skepticism, and that includes being willing to think deeper about our own beliefs.

    Student Garbology Site – Wordless Wednesday: While the student site is still in development in coordination with the CTEC 160 WordPress I class, we’ve created a weekly “Wordless Wednesday” meme for students once the site goes live, and instructors if they wish to use these in their classes.

    The idea is based upon the long-held blogging tradition for bloggers to publish an image on Wednesdays without commentary. They encourage their readers to respond to the image in the comments. Some readers are inspired to write poems, share stories, offer commentary and essays, or just add a few thoughtful comments – it’s an opportunity for a prompt, to create a discussion based upon a visual.

    If you would like to offer or recommend images to this project for the student site or for your class, please contact us.

    The following is a summary of the news in and around the subject of garbology, our regular attempt to collect more resources, references, and information you may use in your classroom discussions.

    Reminders and Nags

    Book Club Meeting: Please add Friday, November 21, from 12-1:30PM to your calendar for the next Garbology Book Club Meeting in the Cannell Library (LIB 101). It is open to faculty and students.

    Discussions: We have numerous discussions on the site for you to participate in to learn more about garbology and how to incorporate it into the classroom. See the Discussions category.

    Ideas: If your class has incorporated any or all of the Garbology book into your curriculum, we’d love to hear about it. If not, are you wondering how to incorporate garbology into your curriculum? Check out the list created by the brainstorming sessions from the Faculty Focus event on Clark Faculty Ideas for Garbology Projects.

    Garbology, Garbage, Recycling, and Related News

    Garbology Announced on The Independent:Clark Throws Book at Garbage” was the clever title for the announcement of the Common Read project for Clark. (More …)

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 6:28 am on October 20, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: cities, city clean up, , garbage trucks, historical images, , history of garbage, recycling, , sewer systems   

    Historical Images from Seattle Municipal Archives 

    The Flickr collection by the Seattle Municipal Archives offers rare images associated with garbage collection, sewer development, recycling, and clean up days in Seattle since the early 1900s. These images are public domain and available to use in your classes.

    Historical Garbage Truck in Seattle - Seattle Municipal ArchivesClean Up Day in SeattleEarly recycling can in Seattle - Seattle Municipal Archives.Horse and wagon for picking up garbage in Seattle - Seattle Municipal ArchivesStreet flusher, cleaning out the dirty streets of Seattle - Seattle Municipal ArchivesCollecting, sorting, and recycling bottles in Seattle - Seattle Municipal Archives.Working on building the sewer lines in Seattle - Seattle Municipal Archives.Recycling program collection bags - Seattle Municipal Archives.Hauling the garbage away after a clean up in Seattle - Seattle Municipal Archives.

     
  • janetteclay 11:32 am on September 28, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , museum, recycling   

    Plastics Unwrapped Exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society 

    The Oregon Historical Society is currently showing a temporary exhibit titled Plastics Unwrapped. The exhibit gives a brief history of plastic, its usage in modern society, and also its waste and impact. Collection of plastic related garbage.

    The exhibit ends on January 1, 2015.

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 11:30 am on September 19, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: bees, campaigns, cell phones, cleanup, do something, garbage campaigns, , parties, , recycling, social, trash campaigns, youth   

    Inspired by DoSomething.org Trash Campaigns 

    Do Something is a non-profit organization designed to work with young people to inspire and motivate them to social change and activism. There are about 2.8 million members participating in cause-based campaigns.

    Collection of images from Do Something campaigns on garbage and recycling activities.

    Many of their campaigns are associated with garbology. These might inspire you to involve your class in Do Something campaign or create their own with Do Something as a platform for their garbology projects.

    You never know where an idea may come from and Do Something kids have some great ones.

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 10:57 am on September 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , defense, , , fallacies, , questions, recycling, thesis,   

    Discussion: Three Questions About Garbology and Your Class 

    List 3 questions you will ask in your class to encourage discussion about garbology.

    EXAMPLE: English 101

    • What arguments do people make about waste?
    • What are the fallacies that people use to justify their response to garbage and recycling?
    • What is the thesis of the book?
     
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