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  • Garbology Admin 12:00 pm on April 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , recycling news,   

    Recycling: Past, Present & Future 

    Why recycle? Recycle is a process where you can reuse the material again. It’s like adding additional life to some materials. Some material can be recycled and some material can’t be. Without a recycle icon stamped is not recyclable, so therefore, it is trash.

    Past

    In the past, people bought, used, and threw items away. The amount of materials in landfills that got bigger and bigger. The cycle of buying, using, and throwing trash never stops. The amount in the landfill is so huge and it caught people’s attention and created concern for environment and its impact on other animals, air, and water.

    Present

    People are recycling aluminum cans, steel cans, newspapers, papers, cardboards, plastics, and magazines. People go online to find the latest news. Many companies urge people to sign up for paperless bills and online magazine subscriptions, but some people in the older generation buy newspaper to read, send bills via mail, and receive magazine via shipping. Kids use old cards and other recycled materials to create a recycled greeting card such as Valentine’s Day, Christmas card, and etc.

    Future

    Recycling will carry over into the future. People will have newer idea on how to improve recycling. After the older generation is gone, more people will be using online magazines, paperless bills, and paper money will be gone too. People will be carrying their own containers for water, coffee, or soda. Many art sculptures are made from recycled materials.

    Final Thought

    It is hard to believe how huge the landfill is. I think plastic is probably the biggest enemy trash in the sea, air, and the land. I think people should try to reuse a plastic container and refill with what have gone inside. This is better than throwing it away. It will eliminate recycling plastic. Keeping the landfills less is a toughest job.   Earth is your home, so keep it clean and beautiful.

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    • ajweberman 2:56 am on April 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      garbology is the study of famous people’s trash. I invented the darn word so I should know.

  • Lorelle VanFossen 3:55 pm on November 5, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , marine pollution, micro plastic, microplastic, , , noaa, , ocean pollution, recycling news, ,   

    November 11, 2014: Garbology News 

    The following is a summary of the news in and around the subject of garbology, our regular attempt to collect more resources, references, and information you may use in your classroom discussions.

    Garbage Clean Up in the Ocean: This week’s news features recent news stories about the trash in our oceans.

    The Weather Channel showcased a video from NOAA divers returning from a 33-day mission to college marine garbage from the ocean floor around Hawaii’s Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, a UNESCO World Heritage site and among the world’s largest marine conversation areas, totally 57 tons of trash.

    The trash included a 28×7 foot “super net” from a fishing trawler weighing about 11 1/2 tons in addition to more than 8,000 pounds of fishing nets caught on the coral reefs, plastic debris including 1,469 drink bottles, 3,758 bottle caps, and 477 lighters, the latter commonly eaten by birds.

    NOAA estimated 904 tons of marine debris has been removed from the area since 1996 as part of their ongoing Marine Debris Program, which sent reports in regularly during the mission including 10/21: Bottle Caps, Lighters, and Birds Don’t Mix: Cleaning Up Marine Debris at Midway Atoll, 10/17: Where Are All of These Derelict Nets Coming From?, and The Final Count: 57 Tons of Marine Debris Now Out of the Monument. (More …)

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 6:51 am on October 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: bio-waste, ebola, ebola waste, , , , , , , hazardous materials, , health and safety, images, india, medical waste, , , photographs, recycling news, ,   

    October 28, 2014: Garbology News 

    Ebola: The story of the spread of ebola shines a light on the issue of medical waste management. A viral video of a New York Police Office tossing away gloves in a public trash can made the rounds bringing shame and ridicule on police and caregivers even after it was found that the police officer had no contact with patient. News agencies are now questioning how medical waste is handled and how the public is protected from Ebola-associated waste.

    In Texas, a judge blocked disposal of the Ebola victim’s belongings in Louisiana where “six truckloads” were in planned to be transported from Dallas, Texas, across state lines. The State Attorney General, Buddy Caldwell, said he was concerned that the ashes from the Ebola patient could pose a danger to Louisiana’s population.

    The Insurance Journal reported that Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, the first treating Ebola patients in the US, was caught off-guard when the company handling their waste refused to touch the Ebola-related waste.

    Ebola symptoms can include copious amounts of vomiting and diarrhea, and nurses and doctors at Emory donned full hazmat suits to protect themselves. Bags of waste quickly began to pile up.

    “At its peak, we were up to 40 bags a day of medical waste, which took a huge tax on our waste management system,” Emory’s Dr. Aneesh Mehta told colleagues at a medical meeting earlier this month.

    Emory sent staff to Home Depot to buy as many 32-gallon rubber waste containers with lids that they could get their hands on. Emory kept the waste in a special containment area for six days until its Atlanta neighbor, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, helped broker an agreement with Stericycle.

    While U.S. hospitals may be prepared clinically to care for a patient with Ebola, Emory’s experience shows that logistically they are far from ready, biosafety experts said.

    Ebola waste disposal became a hot topic in the US House of Representatives last week. In that article, they offered the following statistics:

    Hospitals ultimately dispose of about 7,000 tons of waste each day, and across the industry spend nearly $10 billion annually to dispose of it.

    According to reports to the Washington Post, bed linens, carpet, and other soiled items must be burned in a high-temperature incinerator at 2,100 degrees Fahrenheit to destroy the virus.

    Here is more news about bio-waste issues related to Ebola.

    Marysville Anti-Garbage Can Resident Followup: An article in the North County Outlook reports on the legality of the city to force a Marysville woman to use and pay for unwanted garbage and recycling services, with the city citing they have the right to require all residents to pay for such services as it is a health and safety concern. (More …)

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 1:16 am on October 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , recycling news, ,   

    October 16, 2014: Garbology Weekly News 

    Garbology News badge.The University of New Mexico’s Lobo Reading Experience this year is also garbology, their common academic reading program. The goals of their project are:

    • To provide a common experience for all university community members to facilitate transition to a new academic year and create connections between classroom and out of class-room experiences.
    • To engage discussions between students, faculty, staff, and community members surrounding societal issues, and to share learning aspirations.
    • To integrate the book within course curriculums across campus providing faculty with a listing of ideas for faculty on how to incorporate it within their classes.
    • Develop a year-long comprehensive program within campus curricular and co-curricular activities, housing, parent association, new student orientation, and human resources that reaches all student, parents, and staff communities.
    • To create the value of reading as a university community.
    • To collaborate with the City of Albuquerque Cultural Services to promote literacy and reading as fun within the libraries, youth programs, and family centers.

    These are in line with the goals of the Clark College program. Check out the Faculty Resources, related books, and more information on their project on their site.

    The following is a summary of the news in and around the subject of garbology, our regular attempt to collect more resources, references, and information you may use in your classroom discussions.

    Reminders and Nags

    Book Club Meeting: The Clark College Garbology Book club will be meeting Friday, October 17, from 12-1:30PM in the Cannell Library (LIB 101). It is open to faculty and students. You do not have to have read the book.

    Take the Poll: Please help us by completing the Poll: Will You Integrate Garbology into Your Class?.

    Discussions: We have numerous discussions on the site for you to participate in to learn more about garbology and how to incorporate it into the classroom. See the Discussions category.

    Ideas: Wondering how to incorporate garbology into your curriculum? Check out the list created by the brainstorming sessions from the Faculty Focus event on Clark Faculty Ideas for Garbology Projects.

    Conference: The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education 2014 Conference & Expo is in Portland October 26-29. Registration is still available.

    Garbology, Garbage, Recycling, and Related News

    Conference: The annual conference for the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) will be in Portland, October 26-29, 2014, at the Oregon Convention Center. The announcement states:

    “The annual Conference & Expo is a very important and ‘must attend’ event for like-minded higher education sustainability professionals to come together to learn, share ideas and best practices with one another and take back to their institutions,” said AASHE Executive Director Stephanie A. Herrera. “We are excited and proud to see this year’s conference come together in one of the most sustainable American cities in the country, and look forward to unveiling the location for the 2015 AASHE Conference & Expo.”

    The AASHE Conference & Expo is the largest gathering of higher education sustainability professionals and students in North America. Attendees from around the world will come together at AASHE 2014 to network and share new innovations, activities, frameworks, learning outcomes, tools, strategies, research, theory and leadership initiatives that are changing the face of sustainability on their campus and surrounding communities.

    The event includes presentations from national experts discussing practices for transformative sustainability education, indigenous practices for sustainability, driving innovations simultaneously at the economy, community, and campus scale, and data to action – advancing sustainability investment decisions. the event also features the creator of “The Story of Stuff” and Greenpeace USA Executive Director Annie Leonard, Environmental Professionals of Color and the Center for Diversity and The Environment founder, Marcelo Bonta, Anna Lappé, bestselling author and sustainable food advocate, and others. There are pre- and post-conference workshops available as well. (More …)

     
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