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  • Garbology Admin 12:00 pm on May 5, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , garbage, , , , , , , ,   

    Garbology – Please Recycle 

    By:

    I am a college student living with my boyfriend and three other roommates. For the most part, we try our best to recycle, whether it being glass/plastic bottles or cardboard boxes. Most of the bottles, either plastic or glass, can be turned in for cash value of five cents.  There are several locations located in Oregon where you can turn in these bottles.

    Over the past couple months, I have been collecting any bottle that can be turned in for cash value and sticking them into white garbage bags. I have collected a total of three full bags and I am on my fourth bag! In addition to collecting these bottles, I am also collecting the metal bottle caps from glass bottles, usually beer or hard cider. I found a great website about how you can recycle your metal bottle caps. It explains that instead of throwing them into your recycling bin, that is also filled with cardboard, metal cans and plastic products, you should put the bottle caps into a metal can then crimp it so they don’t fall out. Why? Well, because the bottle caps are so small that they usually get lost with the other materials when they get sorted by their sizes.

    I have asked my roommates if they could put any bottle that has that cash value in a bag so it makes a little more easier for me to collect the bottles, but really no one does that. Therefore, I have been garbage diving at least once a week before the trash man comes and takes all out garbage.

    The House Bill of 3145 states that water/flavored water, beer/malt beverages, soda water/mineral water, and carbonated soft drinks will be accepted in containers that are 3 liters or less in size. New beverages will be accepted if the bottle or cans are from 4 ounces to 1.5 liters in size. In addition to this, metal cans that require a can opener will not be accepted, along with wine, liquor, dairy or milk substitutes containers. All redeemable containers are labeled with the OR 5¢ refund value on the label.

    Oregon’s Bottle Bill was introduced in 1971 and was created to help address the growing litter problem along Oregon’s beaches, highways and other public areas. It was the very first bottle bill in the United States and was so successful that there are now ten other states that have similar programs.

    -UPDATE-

    March 7th 2015

    My boyfriend and I drive to the nearest BottleDrop A girl putting a glass bottle into the bottledrop centercenter and I turned six  full bags of cans/bottles.

    I would say the overall experience wasn’t terrible, but the machines they use to count/collect the bottles can be a little weird. Its possible it was just the machine I was using that was acting up, but every time I would put in a glass bottle, the little conveyor belts to take the bottle down, wouldn’t grab the bottle, almost like it was too heavy. Therefore, I would have to slightly push the bottle in to give the conveyor belt a little help. Sometimes I would push the bottle a little too much and the machine would tell me to not throw in the bottles.

    The other issue that happened was that the machine would would just stop, spit out a receipt of all the bottles I had collected, and would require a person to “fix” the machine. All the worker would have to do is open the machine, it would print out a receipt for them,  it looks fine, close it and it would start working again. This happened probably about four times.

    a girl holding up 11 dollarsI had turned in a total of 229 cans and bottles! The total amount I received was $11.45, which isn’t too bad for just collecting bottles over the course of 3 months.

    It felt really good to get money back just by collecting bottles and cans that you use everyday.

     
  • Garbology Admin 12:00 pm on April 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , garbage, , , , , , , , , ,   

    Recycling: Past, Present & Future 

    Why recycle? Recycle is a process where you can reuse the material again. It’s like adding additional life to some materials. Some material can be recycled and some material can’t be. Without a recycle icon stamped is not recyclable, so therefore, it is trash.

    Past

    In the past, people bought, used, and threw items away. The amount of materials in landfills that got bigger and bigger. The cycle of buying, using, and throwing trash never stops. The amount in the landfill is so huge and it caught people’s attention and created concern for environment and its impact on other animals, air, and water.

    Present

    People are recycling aluminum cans, steel cans, newspapers, papers, cardboards, plastics, and magazines. People go online to find the latest news. Many companies urge people to sign up for paperless bills and online magazine subscriptions, but some people in the older generation buy newspaper to read, send bills via mail, and receive magazine via shipping. Kids use old cards and other recycled materials to create a recycled greeting card such as Valentine’s Day, Christmas card, and etc.

    Future

    Recycling will carry over into the future. People will have newer idea on how to improve recycling. After the older generation is gone, more people will be using online magazines, paperless bills, and paper money will be gone too. People will be carrying their own containers for water, coffee, or soda. Many art sculptures are made from recycled materials.

    Final Thought

    It is hard to believe how huge the landfill is. I think plastic is probably the biggest enemy trash in the sea, air, and the land. I think people should try to reuse a plastic container and refill with what have gone inside. This is better than throwing it away. It will eliminate recycling plastic. Keeping the landfills less is a toughest job.   Earth is your home, so keep it clean and beautiful.

     
    • ajweberman 2:56 am on April 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      garbology is the study of famous people’s trash. I invented the darn word so I should know.

  • Lorelle VanFossen 10:13 pm on March 12, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , city garbage management, educational books, england, garbage, historical trash, , london, municipal garbage, reading material, , , victorian   

    New Book: Dirty Old London: A History of the Victorians’ Infamous Filth 

    NPR Radio did a special report on the new book by Lee Jackson, “‘Dirty Old London’: A History Of The Victorians’ Infamous Filth.”

    In the 19th century, London was the capital of the largest empire the world had ever known — and it was infamously filthy. It had choking, sooty fogs; the Thames River was thick with human sewage; and the streets were covered with mud.

    But according to Lee Jackson, author of Dirty Old London: The Victorian Fight Against Filth, mud was actually a euphemism. “It was essentially composed of horse dung,” he tells Fresh Air’s Sam Briger. “There were tens of thousands of working horses in London [with] inevitable consequences for the streets. And the Victorians never really found an effective way of removing that, unfortunately.”

    In fact, by the 1890s, there were approximately 300,000 horses and 1,000 tons of dung a day in London. What the Victorians did, Lee says, was employ boys ages 12 to 14 to dodge between the traffic and try to scoop up the excrement as soon as it hit the streets.

    To the public health-minded Victorian, London presented an overwhelming reform challenge. But there wasn’t change until the city took over.

    “It takes decades for people to accept that the state perhaps has a role in how they manage their household, how they manage their rubbish, their toilet facilities even,” Lee says. “The state basically does intervene and it is that idea of a central authority that is actively concerned — what the Victorians would’ve called ‘municipal socialism.’ … That mission to improve people’s lives on a very day-to-day basis was carried on throughout the 20th century.”

    You can listen to the interview and read the interview highlights on NPR.

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 5:28 am on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , alice bradshaw, , artist, artwork, , environmental art, exhibits, galleries, garbage, glossary, jargon, rubbish, rubbish artist, terminology, , ,   

    Alice Bradshaw: Rubbish Artist and Educator 

    Alice Bradshaw - Doodle - The Good Life - Apartment - April 2005 - photo courtesy of Paul Harfleet.

    Alice Bradshaw – Doodle – The Good Life – Apartment – April 2005 – photo courtesy of Paul Harfleet

    Alice Bradshaw, a prize-winning artist and academic specializing in rubbish and trash. Her work has been featured in museums, galleries, and festivals throughout the UK and Australia.

    Alice Bradshaw describes herself this way:

    I work with a wide range of media and processes involving the manipulation of everyday objects and materials. Mass-produced, anonymous objects are often rendered dysfunctional caricatures of themselves, addressing concepts of purpose and futility. I create or accentuate subtleties, blurring distinctions between the absurd and the mundane, with the notion that the environment the work exists in becomes integral to the work itself.

    Rubbish: A Research Project is study project by Rubbish by Bradshaw that is a long time study project. She shares her studies on the various forms of rubbish including crap, debris, detritus, dirt, discards, junk, leftovers, litter, refuse, rejects, shit, ruins, and others. Each one features a definition and quotes, citations, and references that may be of value to you and your classes.

    On the topic of garbage she shares:

    “I use the word ‘garbage’ […] because I think it’s really recognizable to people. I think that’s what most people call their waste or their discards. That’s why I use it; it’s not a statement of my political or ideological stance on the issue of discards. A lot of people feel very strongly about choosing the right word, and I really respect where that comes from. I think that what we call the things we throw away is very important and it does relate to the way that what we throw out is constructed as dirty and not okay to touch or to consider as having value or being a resource.”
    Heather Rogers – Gone Tomorrow: The Hidden Life of Garbage (2005) The New Press.

    “A Dump: The whole world, everything which surrounds me here, is to me a boundless dump with no ends or borders, an inexhaustible, diverse sea of garbage. This whole dump is full of twinkling stars, reflections and fragments of cultures.” […] A dump not only devours everything, preserving forever, but one might say it continually generates something: this is where some kind of shoots come from for new project, ideas, a certain enthusiasm arises, hopes for rebirth of something, though it is well-known that all of this will be covered with new layers of garbage.”
    Ilya Kabakov – Documents of Contemporary Art: The Archive (2006) p.32/37

    “Young people everywhere have been allowed to choose between love and a garbage disposal unit. Everywhere they have chosen the garbage disposal unit.”
    Guy Debord – Formula for a New City, The Incomplete Works of the Situationist International, ed. Christopher Gray (1974)

    “A newspaper that you’re not reading can be used for anything; and the same people didn’t think it was immoral to wrap their garbage in newspaper.”
    Robert Rauschenberg in interview with by Dorothy Seckler, Archives of American Art (1965)

    Her other projects include:

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 11:24 am on January 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: compost, compost handling, fines, garbage, , ,   

    Seattle Uses Stickers Before Fines on Garbage 

    The Atlantic labels Seattle’s compost stickers “Scarlet Letters” for their program to divert 38,000 tons of food scraps from landfills to compost facilities.

    One of the cities leading the charge in the effort to staunch food waste is Seattle, which passed a law last September that requires residents to compost leftover food. The law went into effect in January, but to educate Seattleites the city is using a particularly aggressive method: shame.

    If the city’s waste-management contractors encounter a house, apartment, or commercial property with garbage containing more than 10 percent recyclables or food, they tag the garbage bins with a bright red sticker. “I’m sure neighbors are going to see these on their other neighbors’ cans,” one contractor told NPR earlier this week. “Right now, I’m tagging probably every fifth can.”
    “The stickers are like getting an ‘F’ on a school paper.”

    “The stickers are like getting an ‘F’ on a school paper,” one Seattle resident wrote in an email, adding that some craftier residents were simply using their garbage disposals more to skirt the law.

    The sticker system will continue until July, at which time Seattle begins fining “households, landlords, and businesses for failing to sort food waste.” Fines range from $1 for houses and multiple residence apartments and buildings fined $50 for failure to comply with the composting regulations.

     
  • janetteclay 11:32 am on September 28, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , garbage, museum,   

    Plastics Unwrapped Exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society 

    The Oregon Historical Society is currently showing a temporary exhibit titled Plastics Unwrapped. The exhibit gives a brief history of plastic, its usage in modern society, and also its waste and impact. Collection of plastic related garbage.

    The exhibit ends on January 1, 2015.

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 3:42 pm on September 25, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: albatross, , garbage, , impact, , , , pollution, sea,   

    Garbology and Birds: Baby Albatross and Plastic [VIDEO] 

    The following short film is by Chris Jordan called “Midway: Message from the Gyre.”

    Called a “powerful visual,” the film goes to one of the remotest islands in the world for several years where tens of thousands of baby albatross die each year from trying to digest plastic from the Plastic Garbage Patch, where the garbage of the ocean gathers in the currents.

     
  • Lorelle VanFossen 11:18 pm on September 12, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: garbage, garbage removal line, garbage supply line, supply chain, taking out the trash, trash talk, , where does garbage go?   

    Trash Talk: Why Do We Know So Much About the Supply Chain and So Little About the Removal Chain? 

    Trash – Track asks a good question:

    Why Do We Know So Much About the Supply Chain and So Little About the Removal Chain?

     
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